FaunaFocus

Monthly Archives: February 2018

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Green Turtle

All 8 species of sea turtles, including the green turtle, are endangered or threatened due to vulnerability to anthropogenic impacts during all life-stages.

Green Turtle

Artificial light alters the behavior of nesting green turtles and can be fatal to hatchlings attracted to the light sources instead of the water.

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Green Turtle

Due to warming climates, 90% of green turtles at the Great Barrier Reef are hatching female.

Green Turtle

Green turtle copulation can last several hours, with the longest recorded mounting episode lasting 119 hours.

Green Turtle

Green turtles use wave propogation direction and magnetic channels to help them navigate.

Green Turtle

Unlike other sea turtles, green turtles only have one pair of prefrontal scales.

Green Turtle

Green turtles primarily use vision to detect plants and prey and use visual displays when communicating, such as during mating.

Green Turtle

Green turtles are polygynandrous, meaning that females and males will have multiple mates.

Green Turtle

Although many countries have laws protecting green turtles, they are poached for their eggs, meat, and shells in areas around the world, such as South East Asia.

Green Turtle

Green turtles are black upon hatching, but change color over the course of thier lives.

Green Turtle

Juvenile green turtles are faster swimmers than other sea turtles because of the way they stroke their foreflippers.

Green Turtle

Green turtles suffer from parasitic trematode eggs, known as flukes, that cause inflammation and death.

Green Turtle

The soft-shelled, white eggs of green turtles take 30-90 days to incubate, taking longer in wet seasons.

Green Turtle

The green turtle has a strong beak and short, serrated jaws that aid in ripping and tearing apart plants.

Green Turtle

Like many turtles, green turtles’ development is affected by temperature. Cooler environments produce more males while warmer nests hatch more females.

Green Turtle

A female green turtle will revisit her birthplace, or a beach with similar sand texture and color, to breed and lay her eggs every 2-4 years.

Green Turtle

Rival green turtles will attack actively mating pairs in order to dislodge the male from the female and take his place.

Green Turtle

Female green turtles have “mating notches” on their shoulders that assist males in grasping and mounting during copulation.

Green Turtle

There is no parental investment by green turtles beyond the mother’s egg-laying and camouflaging of the nest.

Green Turtle

Immediately after juvenile green turtles hatch, they flee to the ocean until they mature and return to their natal beach for mating.

Green Turtle

Green turtle hatchlings are at a higher risk of predation than adult green sea turtles.

Green Turtle

Green turtles are normally solitary, but travel in large groups that usually originate from the same natal beach.

Green Turtle

As green turtles graze on sea grass and algae, they play a role in their ecosystem by facilitating nutrient turnover and sea grass regrowth.

Green Turtle

During their summer breeding season, green turtles settle on the beaches of over 140 countries, but are most frequently found on the coastlines of Cyprus and Turkey.

Green Turtle

Green turtles use major current systems to migrate to their natal nesting beaches.

Green Turtle

Green turtles begin their lives as omnivores and gradually shift to a more herbivorous diet as they mature.

Green Turtle

Green turtles are a migratory, cosmopolitan species found in shallow tropical and subtropical waters and coastline beaches within 40 degrees north or south of the equator.

Green Turtle

Green turtles are the second largest overall species of sea turtles after the leatherback.

Green Turtle

Green turtles maintain home ranges throughout the year, but are not territorial.

Green Turtle

Because green turtles are highly mobile throughout their lives, they are opportunistic feeders.