FaunaFocus

Monthly Archives: December 2019

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is not a common species kept in captivity in the United States, but their friendly disposition makes them well-suited pets.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari’s generation length is 7 years.

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Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari calls frequently but is not as vocal as other araçaris, making loud rising sounds that differ from other araçaris.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari’s global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as “uncommon”.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Both curl-crested araçari parents help brood the chicks by incubating the eggs, feeding the offspring, and cleaning the nest.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is mainly arboreal, but has been seen on the ground feeding with other bird species.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Based on a model of Amazonian deforestation, the curl-crested araçari is suspected to lose 16.3-20.6% of its habitat over 3 generations of 21 years.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-crested araçaris have been recorded mating in June and data suggests a breeding season of May to August, possibly to November or even February.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Do you think you know the curl-crested araçari? Test your knowledge of curl-crested araçari FaunaFacts with this trivia quiz!

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari has a decreasing population trend and is suspected to decline about 25% over 3 generations of 21 years.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Female curl-crested araçaris lay 3-6 pure white eggs in the hollow nest cavity floor and both parents incbuate them for 16-18 days.

Curl-Crested Aracari

There is debate over whether the curl-crested araçari’s scientific name should be spelled Pteroglossus beauharnaisii or Pteroglossus beauharnaesii.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-crested araçari chicks are born blind and naked and fledging occurs in 43-50 days.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Male curl-crested araçaris modify the nest site in tree cavities and coax the female to it for her approval.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is not subject to education and awareness programs and is not included in international legislation, management, or trade controls.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Very little is known about the curl-crested araçari’s reproduction, and no courtship has been observed in captivity.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-crested araçaris frequently forage in the mid-level and canopy of forest edges as well as small bushes, clearings, and even on the ground.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Although there is no action recovery plan, systemic monitoring schemes, or invasive species control in place for the curl-crested araçari, conservation sites have been identified for the bird.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari was first described by Johann Georg Wagler in 1832 and was formerly placed in the monotypic genus, “Beauharnaisius”, rather than its current genus, “Pteroglossus”.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-crested araçaris sleep with their long tails folded over their backs.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari has an over-sized, heavy, colorful bill for plucking fruit from vegetation and drinking water from the crevices of trees.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Unlike any other bird, the curl-crested araçari has modified head feathers that resemble shiny black pieces of plastic and give the bird its common name.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-crested araçaris are docile, peaceful, social and move about in flocks of 4-12, calling frequently.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari can be identified from other araçaris by its more diffuse facial patterns, yellow underparts with a single red breast band and ornately-patterned, multicolored bill.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is not a migrant and is not migratory.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is evaluated as “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List because of its extremely large range and estimated population size.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari has zygodactylous toes as two point forward and two point backwards.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari inhabits forest habitats including subtropical and tropical moist lowlands and swamps.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is endemic to South America and has an extremely large range across Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru.

Curl-Crested Aracari

The curl-crested araçari is primarily a frugivore but will also take nestlings of birds, such as the yellow-rumped cacique.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Both sexes of the curl-crested araçari measure 40-46 cm. (16-18 in.) long and weigh 164-280 g. (6-10 oz.), but females have shorter bills.

Curl-Crested Aracari

Curl-Crested Araçari (Pteroglossus beauharnaisii)