FaunaFocus
Gerenuk

Both sexes of gerenuk are of similar size, but the males are more muscular than females causing them to outweigh them.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk have never been an abundant species and make up less than 0.5% of the total biomass of hoofed mammals in Tsavo National Park where it is a protected species and...

Gerenuk

The gerenuk was first described by Victor Brooke in 1879 and the species was named after the specimen-provider Gerald Waller's deceased brother.

Gerenuk

Male gerenuks guard their mates and perform flehmen tests, or lip curl tests, by sampling the female's urine to check for estrous.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk mothers look after their young until their weaned, and male offspring are weaned later than females.

Gerenuk

Female gerenuks give birth to 1 offspring, rarely 2, after a gestation period of 165 days, any time throughout the year depending on the quality of available nutrition.

Gerenuk

Gerenuks have a polygynous mating system as males will attempt to mate with as many females as they can.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is adaptable and does well in a variety of habitats, inhabiting dry savanna and subtropical/tropical dry shrubland habitats.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk inhabits the dry, brushy region of east Africa from the Serengeti plain of Tanzania north along the coast through Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and into southern Somalia.

Gerenuk

As a game animal, the gerenuk is protected in most of its range in the form of tags or permits, and about 10% of the gerenuk population occurs in protected areas.

Gerenuk

Although it has a limited population and range, the gerenuk has been hunted for trophies and bush meat as an uncommon game animal in Africa for over 200 years.

Gerenuk

If current trends continue, the gerenuk may eventually disappear from large parts of its present distribution due to hunting, human encroachment, deforestation, civil conflicts, agricultural expansion, and drought.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk population is decreasing and the largest surviving populations occur in south-western Ethiopia and the northern and eastern rangelands of Kenya.

Gerenuk

Although the gerenuk is currently "Near Threatened", it's close to meeting the threshold for "Vulnerable" due to a decline of 25% over the last 14 years.

Gerenuk

Two gerenuk subspecies are recognized, the southern gerenuk or Scalter's gazelle, and the larger, northern gerenuk, also known as the Waller's gazelle.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk doesn't do well in captivity and has rarely been bred in zoos.

Gerenuk

Although rare, gerenuk contribute to nutrient cycling in the ecosystems in which they live through their foraging activities.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk have become a regular subject in the expanding world of photo-safaris and parks in Africa and help promote ecotourism.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk have evolved several anti-predator adaptations for survival as juveniles and adults, such as remaining motionless, hiding in foliage, and freezing at the approach of danger.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is one of the world's most recognizable antelopes due to its defining features, and is known as the "giraffe gazelle" due to its long neck and long, thin legs.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is diurnal and primarily active during the day.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk young are precocial and begin to walk within minutes of birth.

Gerenuk

Only male gerenuks have head ornamentation in the form of scimitar shaped horns ranging from 25 to 44 cm. in length.

Gerenuk

There are no adverse effects of gerenuk on humans.

Gerenuk

Because they do not form large populations and their food is of limited supply, gerenuk exhibit strange social interactions as males are solitary and territorial and females are social and form...

Gerenuk

The gerenuk's coat is of a pale tawny brown, short, fine, glossy hair that is evenly distributed over the whole body.

Gerenuk

Gerenuk are preyed on by a diverse set of large predators, such as cheetahs, leopards, lions, African wild dogs, hyaenas, servals, honey badgers, caracals, and eagles.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk's common name derives from the Somali name for the animal, gáránúug.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is one of the most exclusive browsers because it has the ability to stand on its lengthy hind legs and use its long neck to obtain tree leaves that...

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is largely independent of water and does not drink free-standing water, instead relying on water taken in when eating succulent plants.

Gerenuk

The gerenuk is herbivorous and an efficient browser of more than 80 different species of herbaceous and succulent plants.