FaunaFocus

Kea

Kea

Male kea take on the responsibility of feeding the female while she nests, as well as the young until they disperse from their natal range.

Kea

Kea

The kea population has declined 50-80% over the last 3 generations, or 36 years, largely due to persecution, and continues to decline rapidly.

Kea

Kea

As opportunistic, generalist omnivorous foragers, kea are primary, secondary, and higher-level consumers and only compete with the kaka for food resources.

Kea

Kea

After a female kea initiates copulation by inviting play or being submissive, the male will feed her a regurgitated meal before mounting.

Kea

Kea

The kea's diet varies by season as it feeds on plants during flowering seasons and relies on trash heaps, flesh, and bone marrow in the winter when foods are scarce.

Kea

Kea

Kea have decurved upper bills, or culmens, and females have shorter, less curved culmens.

Kea

Kea

Kea have a polygynous mating system in which males fight for dominance to become part of the 10% that is allowed to breed in certain years.

Kea

Kea

Kea are diurnal and call and forage in the morning, roost in the middle of the day, and forage again before sleeping in the trees.

Kea

Kea

Kea are colorful birds with bronze olive-green bodies, dull blue primaries, red-orange coverts, and a dull red lower back.

Kea

Kea

Due to a life in an extreme alpine environment, kea are encouraged to opportunistically and inquisitively explore their surroundings and will commonly investigate and destroy human belongings.

Kea

Kea

Kea are opportunistic, generalist, omnivorous foraging parrots that rely on the leaves, buds, and nuts of southern beeches as an important part of their diet.

Kea

Kea

Kea are alpine parrots and inhabit temperate and subtropical/tropical moist lowland forests, shrubland, grassland, and even artificial terrestrial habitats, such as pastureland and urban areas.

Kea

Kea

The kea was described by ornithologist, John Gould, in 1856 and is named after its loud, in-flight "keee-aa" call.

Kea

Kea

Kea are endemic to the mountains of South Island, New Zealand and range from Kahurangi to Fiordland, including the Kaikoura Ranges.

Kea

Kea

Kea are highly social birds that live in family groups of 30-40 and exhibit a variety of social behaviors, such as intricate play.

Kea

Kea

Kea are crow-sized parrots, about 48 cm. long, that display sexual dimorphism as males weigh 20% more and are 5% longer than females and have 12-14% longer bills.

Kea

Kea

Kea are currently "Endangered" and declining rapidly due to predation by introduced mammals and a variety of anthropogenic threats.