FaunaFocus
White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati population in the United States is suspected to be losing genetic contact with populations further south, potentially leading to extirpation in the United States.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis defend themselves using their bent forefeet claws and sharp canines.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is susceptible to canine distemper and rabies.

White-Nosed Coati

Individual white-nosed coatis may live up to 14 years of age.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis will only occasionally cause crop damage and rarely take small farm animals.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coati adult body size is reached by 15 months and females sexually mature a year faster than males, maturing at 2 years.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati's current population trend is decreasing due to major population declines in the 1960s for unknown reasons.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis are sometimes kept as pets.

White-Nosed Coati

When hunting, white-nosed coatis will force vertebrates to the ground with their paws and kill by a bite to the head.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati's coat color and muzzle markings are the only physical characteristics dissimilar from its relatives the South American and Western mountain coatis.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is hunted throughout its range for skin and food, but its fur has no value.

White-Nosed Coati

After 5 months, mother white-nosed coatis will rejoin their group with their young and allow the male to meet his offspring.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is sexually dimorphic in body size as males are much larger than females.

White-Nosed Coati

After a gestation period of 77 days, female white-nosed coatis give birth to 2-7 dependent young weighing 100-180 grams.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is locally threatened as a result of ongoing large-scale habitat loss and legal hunting and is hunted by several predators including cats, boas, and large predatory birds.

White-Nosed Coati

About 3-4 weeks before giving birth, female white-nosed coatis will depart the band to build a nest, often in a palm tree.

White-Nosed Coati

Although the white-nosed coati is classified as "Least Concern" on the IUCN Red List, it is considered and endangered species in New Mexico and is given total legal protection there.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati's snout is long and pointed with a flexible end.

White-Nosed Coati

Although the white-nosed coati searches for food both on the ground and in the forest canopy, frequently climbing to obtain fruits, it is more typically seen on the ground and is...

White-Nosed Coati

Adult male white-nosed coatis are sometimes active at night, but coatis are primarily diurnal and spend the day foraging on the ground before sheltering in the treetops at night.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis will travel up to 2,000 meters in a single day in a quest for food, foraging with their muzzle close to the forest floor to sniff.

White-Nosed Coati

In February or March, the most dominant male white-nosed coati will breed with each member of the band in a tree and is driven away afterward due to his juvenile-killing behavior.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis are omnivores that primarily eat insects, but will feast on beetles, spiders, scorpions, ants, termites, grubs, centipedes, crabs, fruit, mice, lizards, and frogs.

White-Nosed Coati

Adult male white-nosed coatis live territorial, solitary lives and establish non-overlapping ranges that they mark by spraying urine or dragging their abdomens on a surface and spreading anal secretions.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati's black ring-covered tail makes up over half its body length and is held erect while walking.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati's population details are unknown, but estimates range from rare in the United States to common in Costa Rica.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis are highly adaptable, but basically inhabit subtropical/tropical dry high-altitude forests and grasslands, as well as moist lowland forests.

White-Nosed Coati

White-nosed coatis live in protective bands of 4-30 individuals including males up to two years of age and females who are not necessarily related.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is native to North and South America and ranges from southeastern Arizona through Mexico and Central America and into western Colombia and Ecuador.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is plantigrade with shorter forelegs than hindlegs and black, clawed feet with naked soles.

White-Nosed Coati

The white-nosed coati is also known as the "coatimundi", originating from Tupian Indian and translating to "belt nose", referring to the way it tucks its nose under its belly as it...