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https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11951

Along with other species of lemurs, ring-tailed lemurs are responsible for several wildlife reserves being put into place and protecting all other plant and animal species in the area.

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https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11952

Female ring-tailed lemurs typically mate with multiple males during estrous, so males will compete amongst themselves for the right to mate.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11941

Ring-tailed lemurs have improved the economy of Madagascar as they are a common draw for ecotourism.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11943

Ring-tailed lemurs begin mating in April and give birth to 1-2 offspring between August and September after a gestation of 130-144 days.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11948

Because the ring-tailed lemur’s habitat has been altered by humans, their range is large, but their distribution is patchy and dependent on forest cover.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11950

Ring-tailed lemurs are diurnal and search for food from dawn until dusk before huddling together at night to sleep.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11932

Ring-tailed lemurs have four thin fingers and a thumb, with an opposable first toe on the lower appendage to help with climbing trees.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11954

Ring-tailed lemurs have a complex social hierarchy in which females are dominant over males and stay within their native troop.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11926

Ring-tailed lemurs are well-known for their thermoregulatory “sunning” postures, in which they sit upright with their forearms on their knees.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11924

Because of their highly seasonal environment, ring-tailed lemurs are opportunistic omnivores and must exploit a wide variety of food sources throughout the year.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11946

There is no physical sexual dimorphism in the ring-tailed lemur as male and females average the same size of 42.5cm and 2.2kg.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11953

The fur of a ring-tailed lemur is thick and dense and is a solid color ranging from gray to brown being lighter around the face and underbelly.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11922

Ring-tailed lemurs have overlapping home ranges, averaging 1,000m, that are seasonally expanded depending on habitat and habitat quality.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11923

Madagascar’s lemurs, including the ring-tailed lemur, are the most endangered group of mammals and represent the highest primate conservation priority in the world.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11934

The ring-tailed lemur is named for its long, thick, black-and-white-ringed tail and is the only lemur species to possess a striped tail.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11942

Ring-tailed lemurs are found in rainforests, continuous canopy, humid montane, subalpine, dry deciduous, gallery, mixed, dry brush, and spiny thorn, scrub bush forests.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11925

Ring-tailed lemurs are endemic to 9 forests in southern and southwestern Madagascar on the continent of Africa.

https://faunafocus.com/home/november-2018-ring-tailed-lemur/#jp-carousel-11949

Ring-tailed lemurs are highly social and live in groups of 15 to 30 called troops, the largest of any lemur species.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11218

The hawksbill turtle communicates by the use of ritual mating behaviors and breeds in shallow waters near the shore.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11232

Male hawksbill turtles are distinguished from females by a brighter pigmentation, a concave plastron, long claws, and a thicker tail.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11221

Hawksbill turtles are found in shoals, sea grass, algal beds, mangrove bays, lagoons, islands, creeks, mud flats, continental shelves, and hard-bottomed and reef habitats containing sponges.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11231

Once sexually mature, most hawksbill turtles undertake complex movements and become highly migratory, but some may settle near their natal beaches.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11236

The hawksbill turtle inhabits the tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean and reside on the coasts of more than 108 countries.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11220

Hawksbill turtle mating occurs in shallow waters every 2-3 years, but it’s unknown whether the turtles are promiscuous or monogamous.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11246

Young hawksbill turtles are unable to dive into deep water and gather in masses of floating sea plants until they’re older.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11239

Hawksbill turtles play a positive role in the ecosystem by contributing to marine and coastal food webs and transporting nutrients within the oceans.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11228

The entire hawksbill turtle nesting process takes roughly 1-3 hours in which the turtles dig pits, lay their eggs, then cover the nests and return to the sea.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11247

Only about 1 in 1,000 hawksbill turtles will survive to adulthood because they must scramble to the ocean, directly after hatching, while avoiding predators.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11602

Hawksbill turtles are believed to be guided inland to their nesting beaches by magnetic fields and the lunar phases and positioning of the moon.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11216

Hawksbill turtles are primarily spongivorous in the Caribbean, omnivorous in the Indo-Pacific and Great Barrier Reef, and more herbivorous in Australia.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11243

Hawksbill turtles are preyed on by humans, sharks, crocodiles, large fish, and octopi, and their nests are robbed by dogs, raccoons, rats, and humans.

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Humans have become the hawksbill turtle’s major predator by eating the turtle and its eggs, as well as illegally hunting them to sell their scutes.

https://faunafocus.com/home/october-2018/#jp-carousel-11227

Temperature may determine the sex of hawksbill turtles, as cooler environments hatch more males and warmer nests hatch more females.