Okapi

https://faunafocus.com/home/july-2018-okapi/#jp-carousel-9764

Okapi keep defined, non-exclusive, overlapping home ranges with males maintaining more land than females and breeding females having more stable ranges.

Okapi have defined, non-exclusive, overlapping home ranges of several square kilometers and typically occur at densities of about 0.6 animals per square kilometer.

Two adults, one juvenile, and one young may inhabit the same home range, but groups of more than three have never been recorded outside of captivity. Calves remain within their mothers’ home ranges during the first 2-6 months after birth. Okapi generally avoid individuals in adjacent home ranges.

Adult female okapis average home ranges of 3-5 kilometers squared (1.9-3.1 miles squared,) and travel up to 2.5 kilometers, or 1.6 miles, in a day. They mainly share their home ranges with other females or their young. Breeding females have the most stable home ranges.

In comparison, adult males have slightly larger home ranges, averaging 13 kilometers squared, but usually no smaller than 10 kilometers squared, or 6.2 miles squared. Male okapis will travel up to 4 kilometers, or 2.5, miles per day. Adult males with undefined, wide-ranging home ranges move more often and move at greater distances averaging 8-12 kilometers per day.

Lastly, subadult okapis maintain home ranges of 2-3 kilometers squared, or 1.2-1.9 miles squared. They have a more restricted movement than adults and have a tendency to shift.

Sources: (Bodmer & Rabb, 1992; Hart, 2013; Mallon, et al., 2015; Palkovacs, 2000; San Diego Zoo Global, 2017)
Image: cuatrok77

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