FaunaFocus
Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse was considered extinct in the wild until 1996, but due to successful reintroductions, the population currently consists of more than 50 wild mature individuals.

Przewalski's Horse

Wolves, such as the grey wolf (Canis lupus), and humans prey on Przewalski’s horse.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse's tan to reddish brown coloration helps it blend into its grassland and desert habitat.

Przewalski's Horse

The Przewalski's horse's upper and lower incisors are used for cutting vegetation, while its many hypsodont cheek teeth are used for grinding.

Przewalski's Horse

Although there is currently no use or trade in Przewalski's horses, there is potential for capture of animals for cross-breeding as racehorses.

Przewalski's Horse

Lifespan for Przewalski’s horse is 20-25 years.

Przewalski's Horse

Although, historically, Przewalski's horse has declined drastically because of excessive hunting for meat, hunting has been prohibited since 1930 and is not currently a threat.

Przewalski's Horse

After sexual maturity, female Przewalski's horses remain in the herd, but males are driven away to live in bachelor groups before establishing or stealing their own harems.

Przewalski's Horse

Unlike domestic horses, Przewalski's horse sheds the hairs on its tail and mane in the summer all at once before growing a denser coat in the winter.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse mating and birth occurs in the same season, since females come into heat seven to eight days after giving birth.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse foals are able to stand and walk an hour after birth, but don't begin to graze until a few weeks later.

Przewalksi's Horse

Like most prey species, Przewalski’s horse can see a wide field except directly behind it, even when its head is down while grazing or drinking.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse's gestation period is from eleven to twelve months, and it gives birth to one foal during April or May.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalkski's horse is not territorial and although herds don't mix, they will share territory because the stallions are more protective of their mares than their territory.

Przewalski's Horse

After the "rediscovery" of Przewalski's horse for western science, many foals were captured for western zoos, animal parks, and for breeding purposes.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse is threatened by small population size and restricted range, hybridization with domestic horses, loss of genetic diversity, disease, and severe weather.

Przewalski's Horse

The taxonomic position of Przewalski's horse is controversial and no consensus exists whether it is a full species, a subspecies, or a subpopulation, but all extant wild horses belong to the...

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse is a herbivore that feeds on grass, plants, fruit, bark, leaves, and buds and digests plant cellulose in its intestines, rather than the stomach.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalksi's horse can hybridize with domestic horses to produce fertile offspring, even though they are distinct populations.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalk's horse is a steppe herbivore that currently inhabits grassland and desert habitats and can survive under arid conditions when there's access to waterholes.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's and domestic horses are very closely related and have a phylogenetic relationship as sister taxa diverging between 150,000 and 250,000 years ago.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse once roamed throughout Europe and Asia, but today they are only found on reserves in Mongolia and China and in zoos around the world.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse is a very social animal forming permanent herds consisting of one stallion and 4-10 mares with their offspring.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse is crepuscular and spends more than half the day foraging for food.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse is stocky and looks very pony-like with short legs, a short neck, and a massive head.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse can detect smell and sound at great distances and has ears that are long and erect, but can be moved for the localization of sounds.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's horse is considered an endangered species and is legally protected in Mongolia, inhabiting almost entirely protected areas.

Przewalski's Horse

Shy and alert to avoid enemies, Przewalski's horse has a shrill voice.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse is also known as the Mongolian wild horse and the takhi – a Mongolian word meaning "spirit".

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse has never been domesticated and is the only remaining species of wild horse.

Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski’s horse was named after Colonel Nikolai Mikailovich Przewalski, a famous Russian explorer who rediscovered the species for western science in 1879.

Annamite Striped Rabbit

Annamite striped rabbits are very similar in appearance to their sister species, Sumatran striped rabbits, but morphological and genetic data support species-level distinction.

Annamite Striped Rabbit

The Annamite striped rabbit was first observed in 1995 by biologist Rob Timmins in Bak Lak, Laos, and was described in 1999.