Mule Deer

Mule Deer

The mule deer is remarkably adaptable and can be found in forests, savannas, shrublands, grasslands, wetlands, deserts, intertidal shorelines, artificial terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and even habitats with introduced vegetation.

The mule deer is remarkably adaptable and is well adapted to a varity of habitats.

The mule deer can be found in temperate forests, savannas, shrublands, scrub habitats, open ranges, grasslands, fields, wetlands, mountainous areas, deserts, semideserts, intertidal shorelines, artificial terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and even habitats with introduced vegetation.

In western North America, the mule deer occupies a wide range of habitat province, regions of land containing particular vegetation types. These habitat provinces include the California woodland chaparral, the Mojave Sonoran desert, the Interior semidesert shrub woodland, the Great Plains, the Colorado Plateau shrubland and forest, the Great Basin, the Sagebrush steepe, the Northern mountain, and the Canadian boreal forest.

Of at least sixty types of natural vegetation west of the 100th meridian in the United States, all but two or three have been occupied by the deer. Several additional vegetation types are inhabited in Canada and Mexico as well. The vegetation types in Mexico are similar to the types occurring in the United States, however, the tropical deciduous vegetation at the tip of Baja California is unique. In Canada, the mule deer occupies five boreal forest types that do not occur in the United States.


Image | © Tony’s Takes, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Sources | (Misuraca, 1999; Sanchez-Rojas & Gallina, 2016; Wallmo 1981)

Learn More About the Mule Deer

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