Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

The tiger shark’s triennial reproductive cycle reduces its ability to recover from fishing pressure but its widespread distribution increases the likelihood that it will survive increasing levels of exploitation.

The tiger shark has relatively fast growth rates and large litters, but the likely triennial reproductive cycle reduces its ability to recover from fishing pressure. The tiger shark has been shown to be at risk in the Arabian Seas region from fishing pressure and from some shark control programs in other regions. The widespread distribution of this species increases the likelihood that it will survive increasing levels of exploitation in certain areas.

Records of tiger shark catches by many fisheries globally are still largely unknown. The species is not commonly caught in large numbers by most commercial fisheries and its catch is rarely recorded. Long-term trends of tiger shark catch rates are available from regional shark control programs and United States fisheries observer programs. Available trends in catch rates are based on analyses of the long-term shark control programs and on observer surveys from the Western North Atlantic. Consequently, there is a lack of adequate data for stock assessment, definition of population structure, and documentation of overall global population trends for the tiger shark.


Image | ©️ Albert Kok, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Sources | (Akhilesh, et al., 2011; Baum & Blachard 2010; Baum, et al., 2003; Bonfil, 2003; Dudley & Simpfendorfer, 2006; Ferreira & Simpfendorfer, 2019; Holmes, et al., 2012; Jabado & Spaet, 2017; Jabado, et al., 2015, 2017; Kattan, 2014 Park, 2007; Paterson, 1990; Reid, Robbins, & Peddemors, 2011; Spaet, Nanninga, & Berumen, 2016; Valinassab, Daryanabard, Dehghani, & Pierce, 2006)

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