Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald eagle breeding varies geographically as populations located further north tend to have shorter breeding seasons and more synchronous nesting periods and produce larger eggs.

Bald eagle populations located further north tend to have shorter breeding seasons and more synchronous nesting periods. Individuals in higher latitudes also often produce larger eggs.

Nesting dates and the timing of egg-laying vary regionally; in Florida, they begin nest building in September, in Ohio they begin in February, and in Alaska they begin in January. Eggs are incubated in Florida beginning in October and may last until April, whereas in Yellowstone, eggs are incubated from March until April. Regardless of their geographic location, eggs are generally incubated for about 35 days, followed by an 11 to 12 week nestling period.

The age at fledging may vary geographically based on climate and food availability, but generally ranges between 8 and 14 weeks. Even after fledging, immature bald eagles may continue their dependency on their parents for an additional 4 to 11 weeks until they are 18 weeks old.


Image | ©️ Jerry McFarland, Some Rights Reserved, (CC BY-NC 2.0)
Sources | (Alderfer, 2006; Andrews and Mosher, 1982; Bortolotti, 1984b; Bryan, Hopkins, Eldridge, Brisbin, & Jagoe, 2005; Buehler, 2020; Burnie & Wilson, 2001; Crossley, 2011; Curnutt & Robertson, 1994; Dickinson, 2017; Gill, 2006; Jenkins & Jackman, 2006; Millsap, et al., 2004; Saalfeld & Conway, 2010; Siciliano Martina, 2013; Watts & Duerr, 2010)

 

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