Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald eagles are fully migratory and most populations of bald eagles, specifically those in northern regions, migrate to southern, milder climates annually.

Bald eagles are considered full migrants. Most populations, specifically those in northern regions, migrate to southern, milder climates annually.

The migratory behavior of bald eagles varies across their geographic ranges. For instance, some populations, such as those from Yellowstone, only migrate locally for increased foraging opportunities and many southern populations do not migrate at all. Migratory birds from Canadian populations typically travel south to the United States during the winter, likewise, populations nesting in the Great Lakes region may move toward the Atlantic coast, down to the Chesapeake Bay and populations from northeastern United States and Canada may move south and inland, toward the Appalachian Mountains. Bald eagles from the upper Midwest may travel anywhere from 6 to 151 days to reach their summer range and 15 to 77 days to reach their wintering range. Birds return to their nesting sites at varying times, as soon as weather allows.


Image | ©️ Andy Morffew, Some Rights Reserved, (CC BY 2.0)
Sources | (Alderfer, 2006; Andrews & Mosher, 1982; BirdLife International, 2016; Brown, Stevens, & Yates, 1998; Buehler, 2020; Buehler, Mersmann, Fraser, & Seegar, 1991; Burnie & Wilson, 2001; Crossley, 2011; Curnutt & Robertson Jr, 1994; Dickinson, 2017; Gill, 2006; Keister, Anthony, & Holbo, 1985; Mandernack, Solensky, Martell, & Schmitz, 2012; McClelland, et al., 1994; Millsap, et al., 2004; Saalfeld & Conway, 2010; Sibley, 2003; Siciliano Martina, 2013; Stalmaster & Kaiser, 1998)

 

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