Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

The tiger shark relies on Ampullae of Lorenzini electromagnetic receptors on the end of its nose and lateral lines on both sides of the body to perceive its environment and to hunt prey.

The tiger shark relies on electromagnetic receptors to perceive its environment and to hunt prey. Sensing organs called Ampullae of Lorenzini, located on the end of their nose, are filled with a jelly-like substance that reads electromagnetic signals. These signals are sent from the pores to the sensory nerve, and then to the brain. While hunting, tiger sharks use this ability to detect electromagnetic signals given off by fish. Tiger sharks also use these organs to sense changes in water pressure and temperature.

Members of this species also have a lateral line on both sides of the body that runs from the gill line to the base of the tail. The lateral line reads the vibrations in the water from the movement of other animals nearby.

Ampullae of Lorenzini and lateral lines also help detect electromagnetic signals from other sharks. While communally feeding on carcasses, sharks give off signals signifying dominance and thus the order in which they feed.


Image | ©️ Mark Rosenstein, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA)
Sources | (Draper, 2011; Kalmijn, 2000; Kneebone, Natanson, Andrews, & Howell, 2008; Tang & Newbound, 2004)

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