• Tasmanian Devil

    The body size of the Tasmanian devil varies considerably with diet, habitat, and age, and females tend to be slightly smaller than males.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils are famous for their threatening gape or yawn, but this display is performed more from fear and uncertainty than from aggression.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    The Tasmanian devil is an “Endangered” species due to food availability, competition with other devils and quolls, loss of habitat, persecution, vehicle strike, and Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils are usually solitary and not territorial, but may interact aggressively over food and follow a hierarchy in captivity.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils are plagued by Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD), and are one of only seven species in the world that can contract a contagious cancer.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils usually amble slowly with a characteristic gait but can gallop quickly with both hind feet together.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Although a Tasmanian devil can give birth to up to 40 young, only 4 can survive, with an average of 2-3, because of the limited number of mammae in her pouch.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils are most numerous in coastal heath and rangeland areas where agricultural practices maintain a constant supply of carrion and also occur in open, dry schlerophyll forest and mixed schlerophyll-rainforest.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    The Tasmanian devil makes a variety of fierce noises, from harsh coughs and snarls to high pitched screeches, especially when fighting.

  • Tasmanian Devil

    Tasmanian devils are generally nocturnal, but they may be seen sunbathing during the day in quiet areas.

Which animal species will become our first #FaunaFocus for the month of May 2017?! Check out the May 2017 #FaunaFocus Poll where you can vote for multiple animals and even add your own species idea. Feel free to share the poll and campaign for your favorite species!