Forest

Habitats

Forest

  • 1.1. Boreal
  • 1.2. Subarctic
  • 1.3. Subantarctic
  • 1.4. Temperate
  • 1.5. Subtropical/tropical dry
  • 1.6. Subtropical/tropical moist lowland
  • 1.7. Subtropical/tropical mangrove vegetation above high tide level
  • 1.8. Subtropical/tropical swamp
  • 1.9. Subtropical/tropical moist montane

 

Forest Animals

North America

Continents

North America

 

North American Animals

Savanna

Habitats

Savanna

  • 2.1. Dry
  • 2.2. Moist

 

Savanna Animals

Europe

Continents

Europe

 

European Animals

Asia

Continents

Asia

 

Asian Animals

Shrubland

Habitats

Shrubland

  • 3.1. Subarctic
  • 3.2. Subantarctic
  • 3.3. Boreal
  • 3.4. Temperate
  • 3.5. Subtropical/tropical dry
  • 3.6. Subtropical/tropical moist
  • 3.7. Subtropical/tropical high altitude
  • 3.8. Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation

 

Shrubland Animals

Grassland

Habitats

Grassland

  • 4.1. Tundra
  • 4.2. Subarctic
  • 4.3. Subantarctic
  • 4.4. Temperate
  • 4.5. Subtropical/tropical dry
  • 4.6. Subtropical/tropical seasonally wet/flooded
  • 4.7. Subtropical/tropical high altitude

 

Grassland Animals

South America

Continents

South America

 

South American Animals

Wetlands

Habitats

Wetlands (Inland)

  • 5.1. Permanent rivers/streams/creeks (includes waterfalls)
  • 5.2. Seasonal/intermittent/irregular rivers/streams/creeks
  • 5.3. Shrub dominated wetlands
  • 5.4. Bogs, marshes, swamps, fens, peatlands
  • 5.5. Permanent freshwater lakes (over 8 ha)
  • 5.6. Seasonal/intermittent freshwater lakes (over 8 ha)
  • 5.7. Permanent freshwater marshes/pools (under 8 ha)
  • 5.8. Seasonal/intermittent freshwater marshes/pools (under 8 ha)
  • 5.9. Freshwater springs and oases
  • 5.10. Tundra wetlands (inc. pools and temporary waters from snowmelt)
  • 5.11. Alpine wetlands (inc. temporary waters from snowmelt)
  • 5.12. Geothermal wetlands
  • 5.13. Permanent inland deltas
  • 5.14. Permanent saline, brackish or alkaline lakes
  • 5.15. Seasonal/intermittent saline, brackish or alkaline lakes and flats
  • 5.16. Permanent saline, brackish or alkaline marshes/pools
  • 5.17. Seasonal/intermittent saline, brackish or alkaline marshes/pools
  • 5.18. Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems (inland)

 

Wetland Animals

Africa

Continents

Africa

 

African Animals

Rocky

Habitats

Rocky

  • Inland Cliffs
  • Mountain Peaks

 

Rocky Area Animals

Australia

Continents

Australia

 

Australian Animals

Antarctica

Continents

Antarctica

 

Antarctic Animals

Caves & Subterranean

Habitats

Caves & Subterranean (Non-Aquatic)

  • 7.1. Caves
  • 7.2. Other subterranean habitats

 

Caves & Subterranean Animals

Desert

Habitats

Desert

  • 8.1. Hot
  • 8.2. Temperate
  • 8.3. Cold

 

Desert Animals

Marine Neritic

Habitats

Marine Neritic

  • 9.1. Pelagic
  • 9.2. Subtidal rock and rocky reefs
  • 9.3. Subtidal loose rock/pebble/gravel
  • 9.4. Subtidal sandy
  • 9.5. Subtidal sandy-mud
  • 9.6. Subtidal muddy
  • 9.7. Macroalgal/kelp
  • 9.8. Coral Reef
    • 9.8.1. Outer reef channel
    • 9.8.2. Back slope
    • 9.8.3. Foreslope (outer reef slope)
    • 9.8.4. Lagoon
    • 9.8.5. Inter-reef soft substrate
    • 9.8.6. Inter-reef rubble substrate
  • 9.9 Seagrass (Submerged)
  • 9.10 Estuaries

 

Marine Neritic Animals

Marine Oceanic

Habitats

Marine Oceanic

  • 10.1 Epipelagic (0–200 m)
  • 10.2 Mesopelagic (200–1,000 m)
  • 10.3 Bathypelagic (1,000–4,000 m)
  • 10.4 Abyssopelagic (4,000–6,000 m)

 

Marine Oceanic Animals

Marine Deep Ocean Floor

Habitats

Marine Deep Ocean Floor (Benthic and Demersal)

  • 11.1 Continental Slope/Bathyl Zone (200–4,000 m)
    • 11.1.1 Hard Substrate
    • 11.1.2 Soft Substrate
  • 11.2 Abyssal Plain (4,000–6,000 m)
  • 11.3 Abyssal Mountain/Hills (4,000–6,000 m)
  • 11.4 Hadal/Deep Sea Trench (>6,000 m)
  • 11.5 Seamount
  • 11.6 Deep Sea Vents (Rifts/Seeps)

 

Marine Deep Ocean Floor Animals

Marine Intertidal

Habitats

Marine Intertidal

  • 12.1 Rocky Shoreline
  • 12.2 Sandy Shoreline and/or Beaches, Sand Bars, Spits, etc.
  • 12.3 Shingle and/or Pebble Shoreline and/or Beaches
  • 12.4 Mud Shoreline and Intertidal Mud Flats
  • 12.5 Salt Marshes (Emergent Grasses)
  • 12.6 Tidepools
  • 12.7 Mangrove Submerged Roots

 

Marine Intertidal Animals

Marine Coastal/Supratidal

Habitats

Marine Coastal/Supratidal

  • 13.1 Sea Cliffs and Rocky Offshore Islands
  • 13.2 Coastal Caves/Karst
  • 13.3 Coastal Sand Dunes
  • 13.4 Coastal Brackish/Saline Lagoons/Marine Lakes
  • 13.5 Coastal Freshwater Lakes

 

Marine Coastal/Supratidal Animals

Artificial Terrestrial

Habitats

Artificial – Terrestrial

  • 14.1 Arable Land
  • 14.2 Pastureland
  • 14.3 Plantations
  • 14.4 Rural Gardens
  • 14.5 Urban Areas
  • 14.6 Subtropical/Tropical Heavily Degraded Former Forest

 

Artificial Terrestrial Animals

Artificial Aquatic

Habitats

Artificial – Aquatic

  • 15.1 Water Storage Areas [over 8 ha]
  • 15.2 Ponds [below 8 ha]
  • 15.3 Aquaculture Ponds
  • 15.4 Salt Exploitation Sites
  • 15.5 Excavations (open)
  • 15.6 Wastewater Treatment Areas
  • 15.7 Irrigated Land [includes irrigation channels]
  • 15.8 Seasonally Flooded Agricultural Land
  • 15.9 Canals and Drainage Channels, Ditches
  • 15.10 Karst and Other Subterranean Hydrological Systems [human-made]
  • 15.11 Marine Anthropogenic Structures
  • 15.12 Mariculture Cages
  • 15.13 Mari/Brackish-culture Pond

 

Artificial Aquatic
Habitats

Introduced Vegetation

 

Introduced Vegetation Animals

Other

Other

 

Other Habitat Animals

Unknown

Unknown

 

Unknown Habitat Animals

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is not currently found in trade but is desirable and might well be targeted by collectors.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is not currently found in trade but is desirable and might well be targeted by collectors.


Image | © The State of Queensland (Queensland Museum) 2010-2020, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 AU)
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The rainforest-dependent Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is threatened by unmanaged burning and grazing that is severely fragmenting and destroying the remaining forest.

The rainforest-dependent Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is threatened by unmanaged burning and grazing that is severely fragmenting and destroying the remaining forest.

This area would have had larger patches of dry rainforest prior to European settlement and remaining forest is now restricted to isolates, although genetic data suggests a degree of isolation dating back several thousand years. This is prime grazing land, and grazing and attendant fire has accelerated fragmentation.

There is ongoing, unchecked destruction of dry rainforest habitat by fire. Three of the known sites form a cluster near an area of farmland where locals set fires late in the dry season. This has led to hot, uncontrolled fires in recent years that are known to have destroyed rainforest in at least one locality.

The southernmost locality, which exhibits the lowest density and highest genetic divergence, is also likely to be at risk from fire.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The State of Queensland, 2018)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is thought to have similar reproduction as the broad-tailed gecko, mating until autumn and females storing sperm through winter.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is thought to have a similar reproductive strategy as the broad-tailed gecko (Phyllurus platurus). They are inferred to mate at least until autumn and that females store sperm through the winter.

In early March 2001, two sexually mature male Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos were collected. They were in peak reproductive condition with turgid testes and sperm present in the epididymis, inferred from opacity.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Greer, 1989; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has the ability to regenerate its tail.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has the ability to regenerate its tail.

Of 12 individuals, six male, five female, and one juvenile, encountered over two nights by a surveying team in 2003, 75% had regenerated tails. This is a similar proportion to that seen in the Mount Elliot leaf-tailed gecko (Phyllurus amnicola).


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Couper, Schneider, Hoskin, & Covacevich, 2000; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is endangered due to a low extent of occurrence, a severely fragmented distribution, and a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat as a result of burning and grazing.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has been listed as Endangered because its estimated extent of occurrence is approximately 12 km², its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat as a result of burning and grazing.


Image | ©️ Anders Zimny, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; Uetz, Freed, Hošek, 2020)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko appears to be completely forest dependent.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko appears to be completely forest dependent.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Do you think you know the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko? Test your knowledge of Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko FaunaFacts with this trivia quiz!

Click on an answer choice to receive instant feedback. Red answers are incorrect, but allow you to continue guessing. Green answers are correct and will provide additional explanatory information. Sometimes more than one answer is correct!

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko | Play on Quizizz


In what class is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko?
Reptilia
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is categorized in the Reptilia class and is considered a reptile.
Maxillopoda
Amphibia
Diplopoda

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s scientific name?
Phyllurus gulbaru
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s scientific name is Phyllurus gulbaru.
Orraya occultus
Saltuarius cornutu
Saltuarius wyberba

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s common name derives from what language?
Aboriginal
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko was named after an Aboriginal name. The epithet is to be treated as a noun in apposition.
Latin
Swahili
Afrikaans

To what continent are Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos endemic?
Australia
This gecko is endemic to Australia, 37 kilometers northwest of Townsville. Individuals have been collected at Palm Tree Creek (19°20′S, 146°28′E) and on an unnamed tributary of Black River (19°17′S, 146°29′E).
South America
Asia
Africa

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko can regenerate its tail.
True
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has the ability to regenerate its tail.
False

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s reproduction?
Oviporous
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is oviparous and produces young by means of eggs that are hatched after they have been laid by the parent.
Viviparous

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is completely forest dependent.
True
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko appears to be completely forest and rainforest dependent.
False

How much of the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s habitat is protected?
Some
Part of the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s habitat is now protected within Paluma Range National Park, an extension in part motivated by the conservation requirements of this gecko.
All
None
Most

There is extensive population information available for the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko.
False
There is no population information available for the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko.
True

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s evaluation on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species?
Endangered
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has been listed as Endangered because its estimated extent of occurrence is approximately 12 km², its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat as a result of burning and grazing.
Critically Endangered
Extinct in the Wild
Vulnerable

What habitats do Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos inhabit?
Forest
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits subtropical/tropical forests and wetlands.
Wetlands
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits subtropical/tropical forests and wetlands.
Shrubland
Grassland

What is recommended for Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko conservation?
Protected Areas
The establishment and expansion of protected areas is recommended to reduce the rate of habitat loss occurring within the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s range. Effective fire management is also recommended, especially in the south of the range. Development of strategies to mitigate the risk from collection, including keeping the specific identity of localities secret, is another recommendation.
Fire Management
The establishment and expansion of protected areas is recommended to reduce the rate of habitat loss occurring within the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s range. Effective fire management is also recommended, especially in the south of the range. Development of strategies to mitigate the risk from collection, including keeping the specific identity of localities secret, is another recommendation.
Keeping Localities Secret
The establishment and expansion of protected areas is recommended to reduce the rate of habitat loss occurring within the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s range. Effective fire management is also recommended, especially in the south of the range. Development of strategies to mitigate the risk from collection, including keeping the specific identity of localities secret, is another recommendation.
Building Dams

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is desirable and targeted by collectors.
True
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is desirable and might well be targeted by collectors.
False

The skin of the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s head is co-ossified with the skull.
True
The skin of the head is co-ossified with the skull.
False

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s population trend?
Unknown
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s population trend is unknown.
Increasing
Decreasing
Stable

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s primary defense mechanism?
Camouflage
Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are notable for their highly effective camouflage which is in part aided by the spiny tubercles that cover every body part.
Spines
Venomous Bite
Poisonous Toxins

What is the only major threat to the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko?
Collection for the Pet Trade
Collection for the pet trade represents the only major threat to the remaining Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko localities.
Burning
Grazing
Invasive Species

How is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s elliptical ear opening situated on its head?
Vertically
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s ear opening is elliptical and vertical and is much less than half as large as the eye.
Horizontally
Diagonally
Upside-Down

How long are Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos?
89 mm. / 3.5 in.
Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are small in body length at 89 millimeters long.
38 mm. / 1.5 in.
63.5 mm. / 2.5 in.
114 mm. / 4.5 in.-Down

What separates the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko from other leaf-tailed geckos?
Partially Divided Rostral Scale
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is separated from other Phyllurus species by having a partially divided, as opposed to fully divided, rostral scale. The rostral scale is partly divided by a midline groove. The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is also the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus and does not have a very flattened, leaf-shaped tail.
Cylindrical Tail
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is separated from other Phyllurus species by having a partially divided, as opposed to fully divided, rostral scale. The rostral scale is partly divided by a midline groove. The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is also the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus and does not have a very flattened, leaf-shaped tail.
Northern Location
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is separated from other Phyllurus species by having a partially divided, as opposed to fully divided, rostral scale. The rostral scale is partly divided by a midline groove. The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is also the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus and does not have a very flattened, leaf-shaped tail.
Reproduction

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s diet?
Carnivorous
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is a carnivorous animal.
Omnivorous
Herbivorous
Unknown

What threatens the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko?
Pet Trade
The rainforest-dependent Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is threatened by unmanaged burning and grazing that is severely fragmenting and destroying the remaining forest. It is also threatened by collection for the pet trade.
Burning
The rainforest-dependent Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is threatened by unmanaged burning and grazing that is severely fragmenting and destroying the remaining forest. It is also threatened by collection for the pet trade.
Grazing
The rainforest-dependent Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is threatened by unmanaged burning and grazing that is severely fragmenting and destroying the remaining forest. It is also threatened by collection for the pet trade.
Invasive Species

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s rhythm?
Nocturnal
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko appears to be nocturnal. On surveys, all individuals have been found at night, activity beginning soon after dark. Leaf-tailed geckos tend to be nocturnal hunters, most actively searching the forest for food under the cover of night.
Diurnal
Crepuscular
Cathemeral

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s population is severely fragmented.
True
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s population is considered severely fragmented.
False

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko considered?
Terrestrial
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is terrestrial.
Arboreal
Aquatic
Fossorial

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus.
True
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus.
False

How many Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko subspecies are recognized?
0
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has no recognized subspecies.
2
5
20

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko mates until what season?
Fall
They are inferred to mate at least until autumn.
Spring
Summer
Winter

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s digits are banded.
True
The digits are strongly banded. The inner anterior digit has only slightly reduced pigment.
False

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is more closely related to geographically distant congeners than close ones.
True
An analysis of 729 bp of mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes reveals the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko to be a deeply divergent lineage with closer affinities to mid-east Queensland congeners than the geographically neighboring Mount Elliot leaf-tailed gecko (Phyllurus amnicola) on Mount Elliot.
False

How many Gulbaru subpopulations have been identified?
6
Extensive surveys in the southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland has now identified six subpopulations, which are isolated from one another, all in the south Paluma Range west of Townsville. Most of the six localities are distant from one another and exhibit a degree of genetic divergence from one another.
2
4
8

What originated Gulbaru from the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s common name?
Location
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko was named after the Paluma Range, “Gulbaru”. The epithet is to be treated as a noun in apposition.
Western Discoverer
Diet
Physiology

What percentage of Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos typically have regenerated tails?
75%
Of 12 individuals, six male, five female, and one juvenile, encountered over two nights by a surveying team in 2003, 75% had regenerated tails. This is a similar proportion to that seen in the Mount Elliot leaf-tailed gecko (Phyllurus amnicola).
25%
50%
95%

How many eggs does a Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko lay?
2
Four gravid females encountered on December 3, 2001 each contained two shelled eggs. One female was collected and laid two oval-shaped eggs in captivity two weeks later.
200
20
2,000

What type of subtropical/tropical forest habitats do Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos inhabit?
Moist Lowland
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits subtropical/tropical moist lowland forests.
Dry
Swamp
Moist Montane

What is a group of Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos called?
Lounge
A group of Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos is called a lounge.
Hedge
Forge
Scrounge

What type of wetlands habitats do Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos inhabit?
Seasonal Rivers, etc.
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits seasonal/intermittent/irregular wetlands, such as rivers, streams, and creeks.
Permanent Rivers, etc.
Shrub-Dominated
Bogs, etc.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is currently found in trade.
False
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is not currently found in trade.
True

Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos have ___ spinose body tubercles than the ringed thin-tail gecko.
Smaller
There are small tubercles on the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s body with larger tubercles on the base and sides of the tail. The very small spinose body tubercles of the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko are in marked contrast to the large spinose body scales of the ringed thin-tail gecko Phyllurus caudiannulatus.
Larger

How many scales are along the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s rostral shield?
6-7
There are 6-7 scales along the dorsal margin of the rostral shield.
4-5
8-9
2-3

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s primary diet?
Insects
The bulk of this lizard’s diet is primarily comprised of insects. They also hunt a number of other invertebrates along with the odd small rodents or reptile should it get the chance.
Leaves
Lizards
Rodents

Which locality of Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko exhibits the lowest density and highest genetic divergence?
Southern
The southernmost locality, which exhibits the lowest density and highest genetic divergence, is also likely to be at risk from fire.
Northern
Western
Eastern

What is the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s social system?
Solitary
The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is solitary.
Social

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits which section of the continent?
Northeast
This gecko is endemic to Patterson Gorge in the extreme southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland, Australia, 37 kilometers northwest of Townsville. Individuals have been collected at Palm Tree Creek (19°20′S, 146°28′E) and on an unnamed tributary of Black River (19°17′S, 146°29′E).
Southeast
Northwest
Southwest

Female Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos store sperm through the winter.
True
Females store sperm through the winter.
False

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has how many cream bands on the tail?
8
The original tail is dorsally grey, marked with irregular dark blotches showing some alignment along the mid-line. There are eight cream bands on the tail, but the second and fourth are poorly defined. Only the four bands on the attenuated portion extend to the ventral surface. The distal knob is white, ventrally cream, and peppered with brown specks. The regenerated tail lacks the cream bands, is dorsally grey, and mottled with irregular dark blotches. The ventral surface is similar, but with reduced pigmentation. There is a pair of large, dark and white blotches immediately anterior to the tail base.
2
10
4

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has a tail similar to which geckos?
Ringed Thin-Tail Gecko
The possession of a cylindrical, non-depressed, tapering original and regenerated tail separates the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko from all congeners except the ringed thin-tail gecko Phyllurus caudiannulatus and the Oakview leaf-tailed gecko Phyllurus kabikabi.
Oakview Leaf-Tailed Gecko
The possession of a cylindrical, non-depressed, tapering original and regenerated tail separates the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko from all congeners except the ringed thin-tail gecko Phyllurus caudiannulatus and the Oakview leaf-tailed gecko Phyllurus kabikabi.
Long Necked Northern Leaf-Tailed Gecko
Leaf-Tailed Gecko

How much did you know about the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko? Share your results in the comments!

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are small at 89 millimeters long.

Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are small in body length at 89 millimeters long.

Measurements have been taken using Mitutoyo electronic callipers. Additional measurements have been taken in the field in December 2001 of 4 males and 3 females.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The State of Queensland, 2018)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Unlike other leaf-tailed geckos, the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is narrow and cylindrical-shaped with a rostral scale partly divided by a midline groove.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is narrow and cylindrical and separated from other Phyllurus species by having a partially divided, as opposed to fully divided, rostral scale. The rostral scale is partly divided by a midline groove.

There are deep, vertical grooves partially dividing the rostral scale. The rostral is not in contact with the nostril. There are 6-7 scales along the dorsal margin of the rostral shield.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, 2018; Wilson & Swan 2013)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has no recognized subspecies.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko has no recognized subspecies.


Image | ©️ Noelle M. Brooks, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Uetz, Freed, Hošek, 2020; The Wikimedia Foundation, 2019)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are notable for their effective camouflage which is aided by the spiny tubercles that cover every body part.

Rarely seen outside their native habitat, Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos are notable for their highly effective camouflage which is in part aided by the spiny tubercles that cover every body part.

There are small tubercles on the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s body with larger tubercles on the base and sides of the tail. The very small spinose body tubercles of the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko are in marked contrast to the large spinose body scales of the ringed thin-tail gecko Phyllurus caudiannulatus.


Image | ©️ Cam de Jong, Some Rights Reserved, (CC)
Sources | (Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The Wikimedia Foundation, 2020)

 

Learn More About the Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

 

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is oviparous and produces young by means of 2 oval-shaped eggs that are hatched after they have been laid by the mother.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is oviparous and produces young by means of eggs that are hatched after they have been laid by the parent.

Four gravid females encountered on December 3, 2001 each contained two shelled eggs. One female was collected and laid two oval-shaped eggs in captivity two weeks later. After incubation in vermiculite at 26°C for approximately 60 days the eggs failed. Fully formed embryos were found on dissection.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Uetz, Freed, Hošek, 2020)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits subtropical/tropical moist lowland forests and seasonal/intermittent/irregular wetlands, such as rivers, streams, and creeks.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko inhabits subtropical/tropical moist lowland forests and seasonal/intermittent/irregular wetlands, such as rivers, streams, and creeks. It occupies steep rocky habitats inside rainforest.

Individuals have been collected from gullies of Hoop Pine (Araucaria cunninghamii)-dominated microphyll to notophyll vine forest and near running water and boulders in rainforest along drainage lines. Such gullies are set in a matrix of open Eucalyptus woodland.

Most individuals are found among boulders and rock fissures in close proximity to a stream. They are often seen head-down on vertical rock surfaces or foraging low on slender tree trunks.


Image | ©️ Anders Zimny, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The State of Queensland, 2018)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos appear to be nocturnal with activity beginning soon after dark.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko appears to be nocturnal.

On surveys, all individuals have been found at night, activity beginning soon after dark.

Leaf-tailed geckos tend to be nocturnal hunters, most actively searching the forest for food under the cover of night.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (A-Z Animals, 2019; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is terrestrial.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is terrestrial.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is a carnivorous animal and the bulk of this lizard’s diet is primarily comprised of insects.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is a carnivorous animal and the bulk of this lizard’s diet is primarily comprised of insects. They also hunt a number of other invertebrates along with the odd small rodents or reptile should it get the chance.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (A-Z Animals, 2019)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko was named after the Aboriginal name for the Paluma Range, “Gulbaru”.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko was named after the Aboriginal name for the Paluma Range, “Gulbaru”.

The epithet is to be treated as a noun in apposition.


Image | ©️ Noelle M. Brooks, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The State of Queensland, 2018; Uetz, Freed, Hošek, 2020)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Unlike most Phyllurus species, the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko does not have a very flattened, leaf-shaped tail.

Unlike most Phyllurus species, the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko does not have a very flattened, leaf-shaped tail.

The possession of a cylindrical, non-depressed, tapering original and regenerated tail separates the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko from all congeners except the ringed thin-tail gecko Phyllurus caudiannulatus and the Oakview leaf-tailed gecko Phyllurus kabikabi.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The Wikimedia Foundation, 2020)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Extensive surveys in the southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland has identified six subpopulations of Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko.

The estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) for this species has been calculated as 23 km², although this excluded areas between the localities with no suitable habitat, and its area of occupancy (AOO) as 14 km².

Extensive surveys in the southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland has now identified six subpopulations, which are isolated from one another, all in the south Paluma Range west of Townsville. Most of the six localities are distant from one another and exhibit a degree of genetic divergence from one another.

A revised area of occupancy derived from these localities suggests the true area of occupancy may be 10-12 km².


Image | ©️ Noelle M. Brooks, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The State of Queensland, 2018)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is the most northerly member of its genus and is endemic to Patterson Gorge in the extreme southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland, Australia.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is the most northerly member of the genus Phyllurus.

This gecko is endemic to Patterson Gorge in the extreme southern Paluma Range of northeast Queensland, Australia, 37 kilometers northwest of Townsville. Individuals have been collected at Palm Tree Creek (19°20′S, 146°28′E) and on an unnamed tributary of Black River (19°17′S, 146°29′E).

Surveys in the rainforest to the north and south of Patterson Gorge have failed to locate this species.


Image | ©️ iNaturalist, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; Uetz, Freed, Hošek, 2020; The Wikimedia Foundation, 2019)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is grey with irregular dark blotches, a pair of large, pale and dark splotches on the hips, and eight cream bands on the tail.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko’s dorsal base color is grey with irregular dark blotches on the head, body, and limbs. There are blotches on the body that tend to roughly align transversely or align along the dorsal mid-line.

The digits are strongly banded. The inner anterior digit has only slightly reduced pigment.

The body and limbs are ventrally off-white to immaculate cream with slight peppering on the chin and blotching ventrally on the upper forelimb. There are blotches aligned transversely on the limbs. The pectoral and postcloacal regions also have darker pigmentation. The labials are off-white and mottled with brown.

The original tail is dorsally grey, marked with irregular dark blotches showing some alignment along the mid-line. There are eight cream bands on the tail, but the second and fourth are poorly defined. Only the four bands on the attenuated portion extend to the ventral surface. The distal knob is white, ventrally cream, and peppered with brown specks. The regenerated tail lacks the cream bands, is dorsally grey, and mottled with irregular dark blotches. The ventral surface is similar, but with reduced pigmentation. There is a pair of large, dark and white blotches immediately anterior to the tail base.


Image | ©️ Anders Zimny, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Hoskin, 2018; Wilson & Swan 2013)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Targeted surveys coupled with detailed morphological and molecular studies have advanced our knowledge of Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos.

Targeted surveys of small, isolated rainforest patches along the Queensland coast coupled with detailed morphological and molecular studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of leaf-tailed geckos, such as the Gulbaru leaf-tailed geckos.


Image | © The State of Queensland (Queensland Museum) 2010-2020, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 AU)
Sources | (Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; Couper, Covacevich, & Moritz, 1993; Couper, Schneider, & Covacevich, 1997; Couper, Schneider, Hoskin, & Covacevich, 2000)

 

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Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko (Phyllurus gulbaru)

Throughout September 2020, FaunaFocus will be featuring its first gecko species, the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko!

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is endemic to Patterson Gorge in the Paluma Range of northeast Queensland, Australia. This nocturnal, carnivorous hunter is notable for its effective camouflage. Despite its name, it does not have a flattened, leaf-shaped tail, but does have the ability to regenerate it.

 

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Create art inspired by the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko and share it in the FaunaFocus Discord Server or on social media with #faunafocus. Learn about more ways to get involved with FaunaFocus!

EVENTS
Event Date Time (CDT)
Free-For-All: Deadline September 25 12:00 pm
Free-For-All: Livestream September 26 7:00 pm

 


Image | © The State of Queensland (Queensland Museum) 2010-2020, Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 AU)

Gulbaru Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is a highly distinct species of leaf-tailed gecko in the small genus of Australian leaf-tailed geckos, Phyllurus.

The Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko is a highly distinct species of leaf-tailed gecko in the small genus of Australian leaf-tailed geckos, Phyllurus. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing allows the phylogeny to be revised to include this species.

Some of these species, such as the northern leaf-tailed gecko (Saltuarius cornutus), have recently been reassigned to the genus Saltuarius. A phylogeny of the leaf-tailed geckos showed Saltuarius and Phyllurus to be monophyletic groups. The long-necked Northern leaf-tailed gecko (Saltuarius occultus) from the McIlwraith Range was recognized as a deeply divergent lineage basal to Saltuarius and Phyllurus. Re-evaluation of the morphological data, combined with new molecular information, resulted in reassignment of this species at the generic level: Orraya occultus. The molecular data showed the leaf-tail geckos to represent ancient lineages, with the split between Saltuarius and Phyllurus dated at c. 58–74 million years ago and the divergence among species in the mid-east Queensland (MEQ) clade of Phyllurus being c. 31–38 million years ago. Thus it was postulated that the MEQ Phyllurus represent the relictual distribution of an ancient group separated by pre-Pleistocene contraction of rainforest.

The Phyllurus geckos resemble the Uroplatus geckos of Madagascar. This is an example of convergent evolution because they are not closely related.


Image | ©️ David, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Couper, Covacevich, & Moritz, 1993; Couper, Schneider, Hoskin, & Covacevich, 2000; Hoskin, Couper, & Schneider, 2003; The Wikimedia Foundation, 2020)

 

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Free-For-All
Judges
Noelle M. Brooks Ashereast Robin
Date August 2020 Theme Silverstone’s Poison Frog
Entries 5 Winner Faisal Kubba

August has come to an end and the FaunaFocus Free-For-All has concluded! Five different artists chose to depict this month’s FaunaFocus, the Silverstone’s poison frog in a variety of media, each depicting the amphibian’s unusual markings in their own artistic style.

Congratulations to the winner Faisal Kubba, who depicted the Silverstone’s poison frog as a performer of Kabuki theatre with a tadpole riding on its back. With clean lines and textured brushstrokes, Faisal was able to depict the frog’s granular skin and distinct markings.

Faisal will be selecting the FaunaFocus that will be featured in October 2020, which will be announced at the end of September’s Free-For-All livestream. Last month’s winner, Danji Isthmus, has selected September 2020’s FaunaFocus, the Gulbaru leaf-tailed gecko!


FaunaFocus Calendar | Free-For-All | Free-For-All Archives

Silverstone's Poison Frog

Further research is needed into the distribution, population status, ecology, and threats affecting the Silverstone’s poison frog, especially with regards to the impact of illegal trade.

Further research is needed into the distribution, population status, ecology, and threats affecting the Silverstone’s poison frog, especially with regards to the impact of illegal trade. The population status and trends of this species are not fully known, as there is insufficient data for the species.

There is also a need for population monitoring of the status of this species given the threats of habitat loss and harvesting.


Image | ©️ Dev, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group, 2018; Lakeland, Torres, & Rosenthal, 2010)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

Silverstone’s poison frog tadpoles are grayish-brown with insignificant, keratinized, V-shaped beaks and delicately toothed mouths.

Silverstone’s poison frog tadpoles are grayish or blackish-brown, with a few smatterings of darker spotting. The beak of the tadpole is keratinized, but does not appear of considerable size. The mouth has delicately toothed edges, and the lower beak has a broad V-shape. They have a single row of pointed papillae.

As they age, late tadpoles acquire dull yellow pigmentation on their forelimbs, snout, and upper eyelids. The dark brown of the larvae darkens to black as they become froglets and the yellow changes to light orange, and sometimes into red thereafter. The orange area expands over the head and torso. This pattern is developed within a month or so, and expansion of the orange-reddish areas occurs after twelve months.


Image | ©️ Evan Twomey, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Lakeland, Torres, & Rosenthal, 2010; Myers & Daly, 1979; Myers & Daly, 1979)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

Teeth are present on the Silverstone’s poison frog’s maxillary arch.

Teeth are present on the Silverstone’s poison frog’s maxillary arch.


Image | ©️ Tiffany Kosch, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Lakeland, Torres, & Rosenthal, 2010; Myers & Daly, 1979)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

There have been no observations or records of Silverstone’s poison frog courtship.

There have been no observations or records of Silverstone’s poison frog courtship.


Image | ©️ Evan Twomey, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Lakeland, Torres, & Rosenthal, 2010; Myers & Daly, 1979)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

In the past, the Silverstone’s poison frog’s habitat had been somewhat protected, but conservation of other areas is required, as is enforcement on smuggling activities.

In the past, the habitat area where the Silverstone’s poison frog occurs had been somewhat protected by the presence of terrorist groups (accepting drug crops used in drug trafficking). More recently, coca eradication campaigns and alternative development programs have diminished the presence of drug crops in the region.

Conservation of other areas where this species occurs is required, as is enforcement on smuggling activities.


Image | ©️ Dev, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group, 2018)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

The Silverstone’s poison frog is a target for illegal collection and is consistently smuggled for the international pet trade, via Pucallpa in the Ucayali Region.

The Silverstone’s poison frog is a target for illegal collection and is consistently smuggled for the international pet trade, via Pucallpa in the Ucayali Region.

In the late 1980s, over 60 individuals were released at kilometer 20 on the Tarapoto-Yurimaguas road by authorities in charge of animal confiscations.

This species continues to be collected for illegal exportation. One farmer from the mountains east of Tingo Maria stated that he continues to sell “40–60 adults a month” and has done so for the last several years. Despite this, relatively few individuals have been found on the black markets, suggesting that most of them probably died during transit through the cities of Iquitos and Pucallpa. Conversations with locals in December 2016 indicate that the collection and selling by the farmer continues.


Image | ©️ Tiffany Kosch, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Brown, Twomey, Pepper, & Sanchez Rodriguez, 2008; Brown, et al., 2011; Halliday, 2016; IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group, 2018; Lakeland, Torres, & Rosenthal, 2010; Twomey & Brown, 2009; von May, et al., 2008)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

Silverstone’s poison frogs are wary and usually quick to hide, and seem to have some preference for edge situations.

Silverstone’s poison frogs are wary and usually quick to hide, and seem to have some preference for edge situations.


Image | ©️ Dev, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Myers & Daly, 1979)

 

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Silverstone's Poison Frog

The upper third of the Silverstone’s poison frog’s iris is pale bronze with some black suffusion, turning black on the lower two-thirds, with possible minute bronze flecking.

The upper third of the Silverstone’s poison frog’s iris is pale bronze with some black suffusion, turning black on the lower two-thirds, with possible minute bronze flecking.

Eye length is greater than the distance from the anterior edge of the naris to the eye (latter distance 60-88% of eye length). Eye/snout length is 0.70-0.90.


Image | ©️ Tiffany Kosch, All Rights Reserved
Sources | (Myers & Daly, 1979)

 

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